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We hope you all have a lovely Christmas and happy new year.

We are now closed for the winter break. The office re-opens on 9th of January .

The Gardens and Farm Market return on the 31st of March. The House a little later.

Thank you for visiting us and we hope we see you in 2018.

Its early December…I can hardly believe how fast 2017 has zipped by, I feel barely out of ‘Summer mode’ – by the way, I’m in a not yet warmed up office, it’s twenty past seven in the morning, it’s dark and it’s minus 2 degrees outside my window (not much more in here…)…go figure…

It seems as the years go by, they proceed faster and faster. Of course, being busy, being productive and feeling you’re achieving progress and getting to things you doubted you might manage will all contribute to a feeling of time passing quickly. I remember when completing my time in The National Botanic Gardens, one of our lecturers key pieces of parting advice was that if we find ourselves in a job where we realise we spend time watching the clock – move on… Probably sound advice, to which I can happily say I do not relate.

It’s not been plain sailing this year, we’ve certainly had our challenges – storm damage occurring in the garden was I think the biggest single ‘spanner in the works’. It wasn’t nearly as extensive as it might have been, but at a time when we were still open, and had a lot of other work scheduled, a period of 4 weeks or so of clean up is impossible to absorb, and it certainly had a knock on effect. There was also one or two of our larger events which, though highlights of our year at Killruddery, had on their conclusion considerable impact on our work programme. These things though are all part and parcel of managing a large heritage garden, open to the public, and hosting lots of events of different kinds, and of course we welcome these various and diverse activities. Navigating our way through these sometimes demanding circumstances, and producing a good end product, while hopefully making some time for our developmental or remedial works brings a great degree of personal and professional accomplishment and satisfaction, and in fact the ‘juggling’ nature of things, while at times difficult, is ultimately a very gratifying part of our jobs.

One of the tasks that got ‘shunted’ a little, was our annual bulb planting efforts. This year, we planted about 3,500 bulbs. The biggest consideration is the citing of plantings – it must seem as though with all our space, finding a good position for almost anything would be easy. It’s not though – with most bulbs (most plants) the conditions in a particular (localised) spot possess subtle characteristics that can be the difference between a plant thriving as opposed to surviving, enduring for many years, or limping along and eventually fading. I will certainly admit to often ‘pushing the boundaries’ a little in terms of citing a plant in a spot where conditions may not be 100% ideal, or where practical concerns – soil, fine for 10 months of the year but perhaps a bit too dry in high Summer – (in our situation we may not be able to guarantee watering) maybe an issue. A certain spot maybe just right for a particular botanical must have, but ends up being exposed to hazards of the two legged variety, maybe receiving traffic from back of house type activities during certain events. We of course must be mindful of our own activities re maintenance, moving our own machinery around the garden, simple mowing etc. Nothing is quite as straightforward as it might seem to be, the broader macro considerations always come to the fore – which by the way, doesn’t mean we always get it right…(ssshhh…)

So, having failed in the the past with for example the snakes head lilly – Fritillaria meleagris – a really beautiful, small spring bulb, I wanted to try again. One of their key requirements is to avoid drying out too much, they’re a really easy, obliging, trouble free plant, happy to seed around and bulk a little in a few short years if they’re well positioned. My previous attempt bore poor results, planted under some Lime trees, in a (usually) not too dry spot, the moisture levels as it transpired were insufficient, and flowering was sparse and poor. This time, we’ve tried a location I hope will prove more hospitable…I suspect a broken water pipe of old in this area might help…well…you work with what you’ve got.

As I mentioned in previous ‘installments’, you can scarcely go wrong with the real reliables, my own favourite being daffodils. I don’t like them too loud or fussy, split coronas and fully double cultivars leave me cold…this year I opted for the classic dwarf, multi headed Narcissus ‘Minnow’ and a really beautiful one, new to me, Narcissus ‘Stainless’. This one is white and perfect, with ‘bulbs the size of apples’ as one staff member remarked. I look forward to seeing it, massed beneath one or two of our high(ish) profile trees. There are others too, but visitors will need to remember to drop by in the new year to see the Spring bulbs at their best. Many of the varieties I choose are selected with our opening times in mind, plenty of later daffodil varieties, erythronium, bluebells etc. There are some bulbs about that appear much earlier, I suppose planted for those living and working in Killruddery…and of course for their own botanical merits…

Winter of 2017 will be the first of, I estimate 4, maybe 5 winters, when we will hope to complete the lowering of the hedges in the Angles. Anyone who has visited Killruddery is sure to know this part of the garden. Some, who are so inclined, may have wondered about the maintenance or even the age and overall health of the hedges. The height throughout the Angles is about 10 – 11 foot – roughly 3.3 metres in modern parlance. They were at one time considerably higher, but to aid maintenance and try to improve general health, we are beginning the process of reducing the height to about 8 foot – close to 2.5 metres. Making them less top heavy, and a little more manageable for ongoing maintenance, should help things. A significant amount of work, and an enormous amount of material being generated, but overdue, and a very worthwhile task. This work will be carried out on the deciduous hedges during December and January – a small enough window. Hopefully, time will allow similar remedial work to be carried out on the Yew in the angles during March/April. We will also continue our use of young, bare root material to bolster the hedges, and I hope, plug some gaps, both here and at the Beech hedge pond.

Similar to around this time last year, and indeed the year before, we’ve recently completed the latest part of the planting of the car park area. Car park area 3 – A working title, is quite different in character from the first and second areas. Much more open, receiving more sunshine and exposure in general, this is the area closest to our ticket office, and will be passed by pretty much all our visitors. The soil here was poor, some previously completed operations had left the area covered in subsoil (the stuff usually beneath topsoil, lacking in fertility and devoid of hospitable or useful structure), and we firstly needed to incorporate about 60 tonnes of topsoil, and perhaps 20 – 30 tonnes of well rotted manure. Ideally, one would have a lot more preparation time, but as seems inevitable, lots of other things going on, not necessarily in our department, meant this job, though well flagged, ended up being ‘squished’ into an opportune opening at some point where a number of different schedules/ interests/ parties intersected (or more importantly didn’t…) allowing a window of opportunity to magically appear. So, with more or less all (Garden department) hands on deck, we managed to get the job mostly done over a couple of days– there’s a smallish corner yet to be planted and no doubt a tweak or two will be needed. The style of the planting is ‘looser’, using taller plants, involving a greater emphasis on texture and movement. I hope it will mature nicely…as always, time will tell.

So, as the year comes to an end, I feel we conclude on a positive note. A short time ago I felt we were quite behind on a lot of our targets, but a few good weeks have made all the difference, and back on track, we can soon begin our annual couple of days whereby we carry out our clean up and clean out of our work areas, sheds, machines etc.

By the end of this couple of days, our sheds, canteen, office, all our machines, tractors, mowers, buggies etc. will be as clean as they ever can be. We will cleanse, grease, polish, and oil, and attempt to bestow on our various equipment, on which we so heavily rely, a sense of care and attention…as if in gratitude for another hard working year.

The staff of the Garden at Killruddery – Ken, David, Vincent and I, would like to take this opportunity to wish all our visitors, regular and otherwise, our suppliers and partners, and all friends of Killruddery a happy and peaceful Christmas, and a bright, hopeful and exciting new year, and of course to extend our thanks for a great 2017.

Daragh Farren – December 2017

Darragh Farren

Killruddery Head Gardener

At Killruddery Farm Shop we invite you to order your Free-Range turkey or ham, Christmas cake, pudding and hampers for your friends and family.

Teachers Gift Hamper €23.50
Killruddery Mug, Brabazon Blend Coffee, Rhoda Cocoa Chocolate.

Pantry Hamper €55
Killruddery Apple Juice, Killruddery Rapeseed Oil, Brabazon Blend Coffee, Olly’s Honey, Lady Meath’s marmalade, Jam and Wicklow Way Strawberry Wine €55

Breakfast Hamper €25
Killruddery Apple Juice, Brabazon Blend Coffee, Olly’s Honey, Lady Meath’s Marmalade and Killruddery Jam

Wellness €89
Peppermint Tea, Handmade Lavender & Rosemary Soap, Peppermint Soap, Exfoliating Body Scrub, Olly’s Honey, Marino Wool Sicks, Mango Body Butter and all Healing Salve.

Traditional Christmas Cake with Marzipan and Icing.
6″ round Christmas Cake €39
8″ round Christmas Cake €65

Traditional Christmas Cake Plain, to decorate yourself.
6″ round Christmas Cake Plain, €35
8″ round Christmas Cake Plain, €60

 

Call into our farm shop which is open each of the Market days and also from 2pm to 8pm on the 19th, 20th and 21st of December or email us on farmshop@killruddery.com.

 

If a musician is defined by the company he keeps then it is little wonder that Italian pianist Francesco Turrisi skirts facile categorization.
The Turin-born, Dublin-based pianist and multi-instrumentalist has played with former Miles Davis reedsman Dave Liebman, flamenco icon Pepe El Habichuela, kaval player Theodosii Spassov and singer extraordinaire Maria Pia de Vito. He is equally at home playing with jazz veteran Gianluigi Trovesi as he is with Irish sean-nós singer Roisin El Safty and with tarantella specialist Lucilla Galeazzi. Turrisi has toured with Bobby McFerrin, interpreted the music of Steve Reich with Bang on a Can All Stars and, since 2004, has been a core member of celebrated early music ensemble L’ Arpeggiata. And at heart, he is a jazz improviser.
Turrisi, it’s safe to say, is a musical polyglot par excellence and it’s natural that he feels at home in multiple musical settings for his vocabulary is a colorful weave of early music, pan-Mediterranean modal melodies and European flavored jazz.
In spite of his numerous collaborations it’s as a leader that Turrisi has earned his spurs. His four beautifully crafted solo albums and two co-led releases have garnered widespread critical acclaim.
“His ability to rework ancient melodies and rhythms through a contemporary jazz prism marks him out as one of the most striking voices to have emerged on the European jazz scene in the past decade”. Ian Patterson – All About Jazz

Due to all your lovely requests the Gardens will the open as follows over the mid term break.

Saturday 28th to Monday 30th October inclusive:

  • Gardens open 9.30am -6pm
  • House Tours at 1pm & 3pm

Tuesday 31st to Sunday 5th November

  • Gardens Open 9.30pm to 4pm

Wagon open weekdays for tea, coffee and tasty snacks

Tea Room open Saturday & Sunday for tea and coffee, as well as, savoury and sweet bites.

Please note that are Halloween events are on Saturday 28th and Sunday 29th only. Click here for more.

Last admissions to the gardens are an hour before the closing time.

House Tours

Please call 01 2863405 for groups and enquiries.

Garden Only Admission fees

Adults: €7.50
Concession: €6.50
Children under 12 €2

Children under 4 are free.
(All children must be accompanied by an adult)

Find out more about Killruddery Memberships here.

Guided House Tour & Garden Admission

Adult: €14
Concession: €12

Tours for Members (This rate applies to Killruddery Members Only)
House Tour Member: €5

Please note that unfortunately we cannot allow dogs in the formal gardens.

Right now, Summer feels like a long time ago. For me, it passed in a blur, as it does most years, but this year, very definitely it feels as though it really flew by. We were of course pretty busy here in the Garden Department, but I think coped reasonably well with the demands of high season.

We had the usual incidents of a machine breaking down from time to time, occasional flurries of unseasonal weather, the scheduling of various events to navigate, but I feel this year, we had our work running fairly smoothly.
Summer is of course largely about maintenance, keeping lawn areas mowed and clipped, edges looking sharp, watching for watering, keeping on top of weed and pest control, ensuring nice crisp hedges and numerous other weekly/ bi weekly tasks. In summer, apart from at the very peak of maintenance time, you attempt to find little bits of time for non routine work, a pocket of planting here of there, a little bit of regeneration or freshening up in someplace or other…
I would be tentative enough about doing much planting during the summer months – anything planted at this time needs particularly careful monitoring, and so, planting tends to be minimal enough through summer, and takes place in key, easy to watch areas.

We did however get a couple of pockets of Meconopsis (M.grandis, M.betonicifolia) planted in early summer, as well as squeezing a small number randomly through some things like hostas, hellebores etc, allowing them to peep through foliage, producing their superbly striking blues. A few bit and pieces went in along the Venus walk too, woodland perennials mostly.
Like any garden, we have some problem spots where we’ve struggled to establish planting, and I dare say we have more than most. One such area is located above the old pump for the Rock, behind a large Rhododendron. It’s a bit dry, pretty shady, not especially large, but is in it’s own way a high profile spot, passed by many visitors. We have now planted this area with Strobilanthes, a sub shrub native to Asia. Not a particularly showy plant, but possessing of a certain charm, producing it’s slightly salvia like purple flowers late in the season. I’ve found it to be an adaptable plant, easily propagated by cuttings and asking little in terms of maintenance. I hope it will survive here… I feel somewhat hopeful, but time will tell.

At time of writing, the first of the Autumn colours have well and truly begun. A nice day in Autumn can really show the beauty of this time of year, and, when they fall all those leaves are of course of great value to your compost heap. Autumn of 2016 was a particular spectacle – we had some low temperatures, which really activated the pigments involved in producing good autumn foliage, and many dry, bright days, without many high winds, all of which conspired to allow a lasting, and very beautiful display.

 

Autumn foliage colour is a very variable thing. Sometimes, a plant that is known for it’s autumn foliage, may not produce the display you would hope for. Climactic conditions (as mentioned above) and in particular high rainfall, and environmental factors can be at play – for example higher nitrogen or high rainfall levels may inhibit pigment production, good sunlight will help produce vibrant colour. In fact, it’s speculated by some, that climate change will lead to much more spectacular autumn colour in a climate like ours – warmer, drier summers leading to greater sugar levels, leading to enhanced colour. Of course, the counter speculation is that this may be to an extent offset by milder, damper winters…

Genetic factors can enter the equation also. For example a group of plants raised from seed will have variation within their number. Some members will quite simply show over a period of years, that they produce superior colour to some of their ‘siblings’. Of course, knowing that sexual plant production – (seed), produces variation, and vegetative propagation (using a piece of a plant – cutting, division etc.) produces an identical clone to the parent plant, one should select the best performing subjects within a group, and if possible, use perhaps cuttings to raise new material.

We of course, hope for a beautiful autumnal display, while waiting with rakes, blowers, collectors to gather as many leaves as we can for composting. Leaves are one of the very few materials that will produce a really good end product without the addition of any other ingredient. A mass of only grass clippings becomes a sodden, smelly mess, toxic too. A mass of only leaves will produce a dark, friable, healthy compost. It’s also advisable to collect leaves for reasons of plant/garden husbandry – a wet, thick mat of leaves spending weeks on a lawn may kill and will certainly weaken grass, while excessive amounts of leaves entering a pond for example, may lead to a build up of decomposing organic material, promoting an unhealthy environment for plants and fish. Paths too will be more likely to become treacherous underfoot if a layer of soggy leaves adheres to the surface, particularly in the case of paving slabs or concrete.

Our bulb planting will as usual take place over the autumn period. I always buy through an Irish supplier, a wide array being easily available each year. I always feel that with the really reliable spring bulbs – there’s nothing more reliable than a daffodil…you will get some of the best value for money you can spend on your garden. Daffodils are virtually impossible to fail with…ok, so they could rot if damaged pre planting, or if they’re in an overly damp area, but by and large, they have an enviably low failure rate. Some of the lesser known bulbs you might see in a catalogue will have much more exacting requirements, and may not be for the out and out novice, but the trusty daffodil is always a good bet. I personally tend to favour ones that are a little more muted than some, leaning toward varieties with paler colouring or perhaps an elongated trumpet and more interesting structure. There are some really good multi headed options available too, and a range of flowering times and stem heights – these are the kind of considerations you might allow for when making your choices. Many bulbs will bulk up pretty quickly, producing little offsets or babies after a couple of years in the ground. Depending on bulb type and variety, the length of time till flowering size maybe achieved varies quite a bit from perhaps 2 or 3 years, to maybe 6 or 7. Best practice is to, perhaps every 3 or so years, dig up and divide your clumps, replanting without delay – maybe the simplest bit of plant propagation any of us could do. Do this after flowering has finished, or before bulb growth begins – i.e. by late summer/early autumn.

Other reliable spring bulbs that may well feature in my soon to be placed order are things like Cyclamen – very beautiful, pretty tough, and depending on species choice lots of different flowering times, Erythronium – look this one up, they’re fairly reliable and are excellent in a woodland type setting, Fritillaria – I’ll probably go for some F. meleagris but may also treat myself to some of the larger (and sometimes a little pricey) F. imperialis. I probably won’t be able to resist some Eranthis hymalis while I’m at it…the winter aconite will vie with the better known snowdrop as first flower of the new year.

Our Autumn work will also include some of the usual turf care operations, and vital tasks such as mulching. Already we’ve been highlighting some of our many specimen trees, particularly in the angles, by making more generous circles in the turf beneath – in a nutshell, removing the turf close to the trunk. This is something that really shows the tree off beautifully, but in addition, is advisable in order to avoid damage when mowing and to aid establishment and continued health, reducing competition for available nutrient and water, much of which will be absorbed by grass growing close to the base of an immature tree. Mulching is then more effective, and should be applied roughly equal to the spread of the outside of the canopy. Avoid piling organic matter against the base of the trunk – this can encourage disease and sometimes suckering.

Within a couple of days, as I write, we will close for weekdays, leaving just the weekends in October. It’s been a good open season for the garden, and on behalf of my staff – Ken, David and Vincent, and I, we’d like to thank you for visiting and hope you enjoyed your time here. Each year we try to improve the garden, getting it more right on some occasions than others, but always in the hope that our visitors, regular and otherwise get a little pleasure, peace or whatever they need on a particular day or visit, and hopefully leaving each time with a little more of an appreciation of what makes Killruddery the special place it is.

Daragh Farren – September 2017

The House and Gardens are open Saturdays and Sundays in October. The Gardens are open from 9.30am to 6pm, with last entrance at 5pm. House Tours are available at 1pm, 2pm and 3pm each Saturday except for the 1st and the 8th of October.

The Estate walks remain open to Killruddery Members Only on weekdays and weekends.

The Tea Room is open on Saturday and Sunday from 10.30am to 5.30pm.

The Farm Market is every Saturday from 10am to 3pm.

Thank you.