Walled Garden Project

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Nature – at work and play – situated within the grounds of Killruddery House and Gardens.

The Walled Garden Project comprises four acres of space contained within tall red brick walls with an entrance through an impressive and recently restored ornamental gate. Once inside, there’s a definite sense of escape from daily life. Beautiful old magnolia trees in full bloom greet your arrival and vie for your attention with other attractions.

A long relaxed walk down one of the paths leads you past potatoes, spinach, lettuce, asparagus, broccoli, swedes, courgettes and beans, all growing at a furious rate. Not to be outdone, many varieties of herbs are competing to see which will provide the most flavourful salad. Meanwhile, pears, apples, damsons and figs all promise to yield delicious fruit that will find its way on the menu of Killruddery Tearoom, located nearby on the estate in the delightful Ornamental Octagonal Dairy.

Next, the heart of the garden is revealed as a perfect picnic spot – the ideal location for family and friends to experience the full pleasures of the Walled Garden Project. Lay your picnic on the ground or, alternatively, use the granite stones that are artfully arranged in the area as your table and chairs.

Kids will be fascinated by hens running around collectively in their spacious pen, tightly controlled by Killruddery’s very impressive cockerel, affectionately named Mcloughlin. Elsewhere, pigs may be viewed playing with abandon in a nearby open pen.

First built around 1830 and not in full use since the 1950’s the Walled Garden Project is the vision of Anthony Ardee, a member of the Brabazon family that has lived and farmed at the estate since 1618. He said:

“It’s not a restoration of a Victorian walled garden, but a modern use of a wonderfully crafted and thoughtful space. One that a family can relate to, and use to relax and enjoy. It is a working space where produce is grown and people can pick up a sense of connection with food production, and eat their picnic too. If they don’t finish it the pigs and chickens can help.”

The Walled Garden Project at Killruddery House and Gardens is open now. (see below for opening times)